Weavers

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The world of Raranga (weaving)

There are many different versions of this story, this is the one i was taught as a child, Ranginui (the sky father) and Papatūānuku (the earth mother) were joined in a close embrace, and their children lived in the darkness between them. One of their sons, Tāne-nui-a-rangi (Tāne of the heavens, who is also the god of forests and birds), pushed his parents apart. He then hunted for a source of light for the world created by their separation.

Tāne found Hinerauāmoa, the smallest and most fragile star in the sky. She was also the female element he’d been searching for to create humankind. From their union came Hine-te-iwaiwa, the spiritual guardian of weaving, childbirth, and the cycles of the moon.

Maori Weaving with Veranoa Hetet

Born to Master Carver, Rangi Hetet and Master Weaver, Erenora Puketapu- Hetet, Veranoa Hetet grew up totally immersed in Maori Art. With her parents being full-time artists, it was only natural that Veranoa also take this pathway and she has now become an internationally known weaver and artist. Much of her work can be found in private collections throughout the world. Veranoa also has much of her work in public Galleries and buildings throughout New Zealand.

 

 

Jills Kete

The focus of my weaving is Kete Whakairo, using predominantly traditional designs and techniques with a contemporary influence. I choose to work with fine gauge harakeke as this brings another dimension to these exquisite patterns that have been passed through generations. Jill has a page on Facebook, i highly recommend her work and promise that your time will not be wasted checking out her page. Amazing Amazing Amazing

Tangata whenua

Based in the small town of Opotiki, in the Bay Of Plenty, Tangimoe Clay became interested in flax in the late 1980s and has spent a number of years honing her craft.

 

Tangimoe’s works have attracted the attention of an increasing number of collectors and in 2006 she was exhibited in the international touring exhibition Toi Maori: The Eternal Thread.